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Doo Wop - 45's of the Month Club-

Posted by Japheth large on

               

 Doo Wop represents so much in american music culture. No matter what generation you come from, this music strikes a chords in most peoples hearts and takes you back to a time when life was easy. Rock n Roll was just a baby, the beatles hadnt arrived yet, and Vietnam was a long ways away. These songs take you somewhere. For me they are a time capsule that paint a picture of ones First love whether they are arriving or leaving.  When everything was new, and exciting.

             
Featuring the First Doo Wop 45's of the Month Club

        

           Popular in the 1950s and ’60s. Doo-wop music generally featured a lead vocalist singing the melody of the song with a trio or quartet singing background harmony. The term doo-wop is derived from the sounds made by the group as they provided harmonic background for the lead singer.
         The roots of the Doo wop style possibly started with the Ink Spots. They used their vocal harmony to simulate the sound of string or reed sections. The Ink Spots established the pre-emineance of the tenor and bass singer as members of the pop vocal group and their influence can be heard in rhythm-and-blues music beginning in the 1940's  throughout the ’50's, and  even well into the ’70's (No -- Shan Na Na does not count).                This influence is best exhibited in the remakes of the Ink Spots’ hit records “My Prayer” by the Platters and “If I Didn’t Care” (1970) by the Moments.
In fact, Motown’s premier male group of the 1960s and ’70s, the Temptations, had a vocal sound that was inspired by this classic doo-wop style, of the Ink Spots lead singer, Bill Kenny, and  Hoppy Jones. Before i go any further. Lets not forget  female doo-wop, best exemplified by the Chantels, the Shirelles, and Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles.
The popularity of doo-wop music among young singers in urban American communities of the 1950s such as New York City, Chicago, and Baltimore, Maryland, was due in large part to the fact that the music could be performed effectively acappella. Many young enthusiasts in these communities had little access to musical instruments, so the vocal ensemble was the mostpopular musical performing unit. Doo-wop groups seemed to rehearse in locations that provided good echo or reverb—where their harmonies could best be heard. They often rehearsed in hallways and  bathrooms and school cafeteria's. When they were ready for public performance, they sang on stoops and street corners, in community talent shows, and in the hallways of Buildings.  Doo-wop’s appeal for much of the public lay in its artistically powerful simplicity, but this “uncomplicated” type of record also was an ideal, low-budget investment for a small record company to produce. The absence of strings and horns (“sweetening”) in their production gave many of the doo-wop records of the early 1950s were very sparse with instrumentation. The Orioles “Crying in the Chapel” (1953), the Harptones’ “A Sunday Kind of Love” (1953), and the Penguins’ “Earth Angel” (1954) are excellent examples of this.
popular musical performing unit. Doo-wop groups seemed to rehearse in locations that provided good echo or reverb—where their harmonies could best be heard. They often rehearsed in hallways and  bathrooms and school cafeteria's. When they were ready for public performance, they sang on stoops and street corners, in community talent shows, and in the hallways of Buildings.  Doo-wop’s appeal for much of the public lay in its artistically powerful simplicity, but this “uncomplicated” type of record also was an ideal, low-budget investment for a small record company to produce. The absence of strings and horns (“sweetening”) in their production gave many of the doo-wop records of the early 1950s were very sparse with instrumentation. The Orioles “Crying in the Chapel” (1953), the Harptones’ “A Sunday Kind of Love” (1953), and the Penguins’ “Earth Angel” (1954) are excellent examples of this.
        Unfortunately the music industry became big business. It became easy for major labels to re-record these records with bigger production including orchestration and/or strings and horns and sadly, with a different vocal group.
Consistent with the racism in the 1950s, major record labels producing doo-wop records that were originally performed by African-American artists being re-created by white artists, the objective being to sell these covers to a broader, white audience Among the legion of doo-wop records that suffered this fate were the Chords’ “Sh-Boom” (covered by the Crew-Cuts in 1954) and the Moonglows’ “Sincerely” (covered by the McGuire Sisters in 1955). A number of white singing groups adopted the doo-wop style—particularly Italian-American ensembles who shared the same urban environment with the African Americans who originated doo-wop. Like the phenomenon of cover records, the advent of the “clean-cut” teen idols who prospered on American Bandstand, and the popularity of blue-eyed soul, this version of doo-wop further exemplified how black music was co-opted by the white recording industry. The Elegants 
“Little Star” ....Dion and the Belmont“
I Wonder Why” [1958]), and the Four Seasons’ (“Sherry” [1962]). This would be the end of the the glory days of doo wop, beside some short revivals in the 70's, 80's and 90's

Today I am proud to announce RecordPlayerz.com's very own 45's of the Month Club
Check out our "45's of the Month Club" Featuring only Doo Wop from the 50's & early 60's. We start you off with a starter pack of 8 Records, a carry case (holds 50) Groovecraft Vinyl Cleaning kit , 3 Singles sent to you door every month for a whole year. Plus discounts, special offers and freebies all year long.
Discover (or Re-Discover) a magical era in American Music History.
Step back in time one record at. a time.  Click here for more information

 

 

 

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